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Table 1 Effects on the distance of chromosomal separation of clustered miRNAs on the number of clustered miRNAs found in the human, mouse and rat genomes.

From: Filtering of false positive microRNA candidates by a clustering-based approach

Genome Effect Chromosomal distance at which two clustered miRNAs are separated
   1500 nt 3000 nt 6000 nt 10000 nt 25000 nt 50000 nt
Human # of clustered miRNAs 196 217 240 241 242 261
  # of clusters defined 71 68 60 60 60 65
  Average cluster size 2.76 3.19 4 4.02 4.03 4.02
Mouse # of clustered miRNAs 204 215 237 243 253 260
  # of clusters defined 70 53 55 57 58 61
  Average cluster size 2.91 4.06 4.31 4.26 4.36 4.26
Rat # of clustered miRNAs 119 129 145 154 154 160
  # of clusters defined 46 45 48 49 47 48
  Average cluster size 2.59 2.87 3.04 3.14 3.28 3.14
  1. "Average cluster size" is equivalently to the average number of miRNAs found in a single cluster. It can be seen that there is an abrupt increase in the number of clustered miRNAs from the case of 3000 nt to the case of 6000 nt. There are little effects on the number of clustered miRNAs and the number of clusters defined when the separation is more than 10000 nt. To conclude, among the six distances that we have tested, 6000 nt is an optimal chromosomal distance bound within which two clustered miRNAs are separated.