Open Access

Robust test method for time-course microarray experiments

  • Insuk Sohn1, 3Email author,
  • Kouros Owzar2, 3,
  • Stephen L George2, 3,
  • Sujong Kim4 and
  • Sin-Ho Jung2, 3
BMC Bioinformatics201011:391

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2105-11-391

Received: 8 March 2010

Accepted: 22 July 2010

Published: 22 July 2010

Abstract

Background

In a time-course microarray experiment, the expression level for each gene is observed across a number of time-points in order to characterize the temporal trajectories of the gene-expression profiles. For many of these experiments, the scientific aim is the identification of genes for which the trajectories depend on an experimental or phenotypic factor. There is an extensive recent body of literature on statistical methodology for addressing this analytical problem. Most of the existing methods are based on estimating the time-course trajectories using parametric or non-parametric mean regression methods. The sensitivity of these regression methods to outliers, an issue that is well documented in the statistical literature, should be of concern when analyzing microarray data.

Results

In this paper, we propose a robust testing method for identifying genes whose expression time profiles depend on a factor. Furthermore, we propose a multiple testing procedure to adjust for multiplicity.

Conclusions

Through an extensive simulation study, we will illustrate the performance of our method. Finally, we will report the results from applying our method to a case study and discussing potential extensions.

Background

The objective of a time-course microarray experiment is to study the temporal dynamics of the expression profile for each gene. For many of these experiments, the primary objective is to identify genes for which these temporal profiles depend on a phenotypic, experimental or environmental factor. We mention three examples next. Wang and Kim [1] identify genes in Caenorhabditis elegans for which the expression level depends on the dauer state. Graham et al. [2] obtain RNA expressions from kidney tissue from patients ranging between 27 and 92 years old, to identify genes whose expression profiles are age dependent while adjusting for other phenotypic factors. Sekiguchi et al. [3] study the mRNA expression profiles of peripheral blood cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving a TNF-α inhibitor drug. Henceforth, for notational brevity we refer to these temporal expression profiles as gene time-trajectories or simply time-trajectories whenever understood from the context.

There is an extensive recent body of literature on statistical methodology for identifying genes whose time-trajectories depend on a factor. We provide a brief summary of representative works. Park et al. [4] propose a permutation-based two-way ANOVA model. Luna and Li [5] propose a statistical framework based on a shape-invariant additive error model utilizing periodically expressed guide genes. Storey et al. [6] estimate gene expression time-trajectories using splines and then approximate the null sampling distribution of the goodness of fit statistic using a bootstrap method. Sohn et al. [7] extend this method to carry out the inference using permutation resampling. Hong and Li [8] discuss a functional hierarchical model for detecting temporally differentially expressed genes between two experimental conditions for cross sectional designs, where the gene expression profiles are treated as functional data and modelled by basis function expansions. Finally, Angelini et al. [9] use a Bayesian hierarchical model along with Bayes factors for the inference.

One common concern with using the methods described in the above papers, which are based on estimating mean functions, is their sensitivity to outliers which is a common issue in most microarray, including time-course, experiments. Such outliers issue can be common in time-course microarray experiments. For example, our recent research [7] identified genes with potential outlier presence in the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer developmental data [1]. Figure 1 shows the observed and the fitted trajectory based on a natural spline basis of dimension four for nine genes with potential outlier presence. In this paper, we propose a robust testing method for identifying genes for which the gene-expression time-trajectories are different over time among K ≥ 2 groups. The time-trajectories will be estimated using a https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif quantile regression method. The discrepancy between the time-trajectories under the null hypothesis, where the time-trajectories for all K groups coincide, and the alternative, where the time-trajectory for some of the groups differ from the others, is quantified using an F-type goodness of fit statistic. Given that we are testing for a large number of genes, we will also propose a permutation-based multiple testing procedure to accurately control the family-wise error rate (FWER).
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Fig1_HTML.jpg
Figure 1

The observations from control and experimental arms are represented by 'x' and 'o' respectively. The fitted trajectory based on a natural spline basis of dimension four is superimposed for each group (blue for control group and red for experimental group).

The remainder of this paper is organized as follows. In the next section, we provide a technical overview of the proposed method. Thereafter, we evaluate the procedure empirically using an extensive simulation study and by applying it to a published case study. We finalize the paper by a discussion of the empirical results and by considering extensions.

Methods

We propose a robust method for identifying among m genes those whose expression time-trajectories depend on an experimental or phenotypic factor with say K ≥ 2 groups or levels. We will assume that the expressions are observed at L distinct time-points, say 0 ≤ t1 < ... <t L and denote the number of observations for level k {1, ..., K} of the factor at time l {1, ..., L} by n kl . These time-points are assumed to be in common among the genes. Furthermore, we will assume that at least one observation is observed for each group at each time-point (i.e., n kl ≥ 1). Let (ykli 1, ..., y klim ) denote the expression measurements for m genes at time t l (l = 1, ...,L) from subject i(= 1, ..., n kl ) belonging to group k(= 1, ...,K). For a given gene j, we will assume that the expression profile for group k will follow a distribution whose conditional median at time t is g kj (t). For each gene j, following the discussions in [10] and [11], we will estimate each of the K conditional median functions by considering a class of quantile smoothing splines as solutions to
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equa_HTML.gif
Where https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq2_HTML.gif . Here https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq3_HTML.gif denotes the second derivative if g kj evaluated at t > 0. The parameter λ is the smoothing parameter. Here https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq4_HTML.gif denotes a class of "smooth" functions. Each function g kj is estimated based on the expressions belonging to group k for gene j. For gene j the hypotheses of interest are formulated as testing
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equb_HTML.gif
Versus
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equc_HTML.gif
Note that under the null, the function g will no longer depend on k. As such, under the null we will consider estimating a single time-trajectory for each gene as a solution to
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equd_HTML.gif
The function g j is estimated based on all observations of gene j regardless of group membership by pooling within each time-point. Following [11] (appendix A.9), we will employ a pre-specified p-dimensional linear spline basis, say W(t l ) = [W1(t l ), ..., Wp(t l )], common to all m genes. The unknown parameters for gene j are denoted by β kj = [β0,kj, β1,kj, ..., β p,kj ]. As discussed in [11] (see chapters 6 and 7) the estimation can be carried out efficiently using linear programming methods. Additional technical details for this optimization problem, including details about the family https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq4_HTML.gif , are found in section 7.2.1 of [11]. The corresponding https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif residual error sum for group k is then given by
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Eque_HTML.gif
where https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq5_HTML.gif are the corresponding estimators of the parameters. Under the null, the corresponding https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif residual error is given by
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equf_HTML.gif
We reject H j in favor of https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq6_HTML.gif for large values of the F-type statistic
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equg_HTML.gif
We note that the principal objective is not to test the marginal hypotheses H j versus https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq6_HTML.gif . Rather, we primarily aim to test the global null hypothesis https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq7_HTML.gif versus https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq8_HTML.gif . To this end we will generate the null joint distribution of the test statistic https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq9_HTML.gif using a permutation resampling method. Under the 0 , for all the genes, the observations within each time-points are exchangeable. As such, a permutation sample under the null can be obtained by permuting the observation within each time-point. Let n .l denote the number of observations at time l. The number of all possible permutations
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equh_HTML.gif
is all but small sample-size cases prohibitively large. Therefore, we will approximate the exact sampling distribution using B random permutations. The FWER is defined by the probability of rejecting any null hypothesis H j under 0 . We will employ a single-step multiple testing procedure controlling the FWER as described in [12] and [13]. The algorithm is summarized as follows.
  1. 1.

    Compute the the F-test statistics https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq9_HTML.gif ) from the observed (non-permuted) data.

     
  2. 2.

    From the b-th (b = 1, ..., B) permutation sample compute a permutation replicate https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq10_HTML.gif .

     
  3. 3.

    Single-step procedure to control the FWER:

     
  4. (a)

    From the b-th permutation data, calculate https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq11_HTML.gif .

     
  5. (b)

    For gene j, calculate the adjusted p-value as https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq12_HTML.gif .

     
  6. (c)

    For a specified FWER level α, consider gene j significant if https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq13_HTML.gif .

     

Results

We investigate the performance of our method by conducting an extensive simulation study. This will be followed by a discussion of the application of our method to the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer developmental data discussed in [1]. These discussions will be limited to the two-sample case (i.e., K = 2). For notation brevity, we will refer to genes whose time-trajectory depends on the factor as prognostic and non-prognostic otherwise. Similarly, we will refer to the genes whose corresponding FWER P-value is less than the given nominal level as significant or non-significant otherwise. For all of these illustrations, as in [6], we will employ a B-spline basis with knots placed at the 0, 1/(p - 1),2/(p - 1), ..., (p - 2)/(p - 1), 1 quantiles of the observed time points pooled across both samples. For these illustration we set p = 4. Our method is developed within the framework of https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif regression for estimation, and permutation resampling for the inference. For additional notational brevity we will adopt the acronym https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM to refer to our method. To put the discussions in comparative perspective, alongside our results, we will provide those obtained by the permutation method of [7] and the bootstrap method by [6]. Given that these are https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif regression methods, we will denote them by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM and https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT respectively. All of these analyses are carried out using the R statistical environment [14]. The function rq from the quantreg package [11] is used to estimate the quantile regression functions.

Simulation Study

For the simulation study, the expressions will be generated from an outlier contaminated additive error model of the form
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equi_HTML.gif

The first term, μ kj (t l ), denotes the time-trajectory function at time t l for group k. For non-prognostic genes, we will set μ1j(t) = μ2j(t) = 0 while for prognostic genes, we will specify μ1j(t) = 0 and μ2j(t) = 1.5e -t respectively. The error terms are mutually independent and identically distributed according to a standard normal law. The second term in the model, a klij , represents the random outlier which will assume a value of 4, 0, or -4 with probabilities π/2, 1 - π and π/2 respectively. In the case of a normal law, the mean and median coincide. As such, in the absence of the outlier effect (i.e., a klij = 0 almost surely, or equivalent π = 0) the quantile function g kj (t) = μ kj (t) for all t > 0.

For these simulations, we will adopt a design similar to the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer developmental data, by choosing 11 time points t = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, and 12. We will generate four replicates at each time-point from each group (i.e., n1l= n2l= 4 for all l).

To evaluate the FWER, we generate m = 200 non-prognostic genes. A block exchangeable correlation structure with correlation coefficient ρ(= 0, 0.3 or 0.6) and block sizes of 10, is imposed on the measurement errors. The null distribution of the test statistic is approximated from B = 200 resampling (permutation or bootstrap) replicates. Empirical FWER is computed as the proportion of samples rejecting 0 by our testing procedure at a two-sided FWER level of 0.05 among N = 200 simulations. Simulation results are reported in Table 1.
Table 1

Illustration of the empirical FWER based on a nominal two-sided 0.05 level, with m= 200 genes, N= 200 simulation samples and B= 200 resampling replications per sample. The outlier law realizes values -4,0 or 4 with probabilities π/2, 1 - π and π/2 respectively. Under simulation model 1, the outlier effect is added to all time-points. Under simulation model 2, the outlier effect is only added to the first and last time-points.

  

Simulation 1

Simulation 2

π

ρ

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT

0

0

0.035

0.060

0.060

   
 

0.3

0.040

0.035

0.035

   
 

0.6

0.040

0.040

0.040

   

0.05

0

0.040

0.040

0.040

0.065

0.075

0.155

 

0.3

0.040

0.055

0.055

0.050

0.065

0.160

 

0.6

0.060

0.045

0.055

0.075

0.055

0.130

0.1

0

0.035

0.040

0.050

0.035

0.040

0.355

 

0.3

0.040

0.045

0.055

0.050

0.075

0.355

 

0.6

0.060

0.045

0.045

0.050

0.055

0.295

As shown in Table 1, under the simulation model 1, where the outlier effects are identically distributed over the time-points, all three methods control the type I error rate. Under simulation model 2, where only the first and last time-points are contaminated by the outlier effect, the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT method however fails to control the type I error rate. In this case, the type I error rate based on the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT method is seemingly inflated by a factor of three when π = 0.05 or by a factor of six when π = 0.1. This can be explained by the fact that the parametric regression bootstrap is based on the assumption of homoscedasticity of the error terms.

Under simulation model 1, the error terms as the sum of the outlier and measurement error components, although no longer normally distributed, are identically distributed within and among all time-points and groups. Under simulation model 2, the error terms are no longer homoscedastic. As such, it is not surprising that the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT method may not be adequate in this situation.

To investigate the global power (i.e., the probability of rejecting at least one null hypothesis) of this procedure, we generate 10 prognostic genes and 190 non-prognostic genes. A correlation structure similar to that of the FWER case is specified. The corresponding results are reported in Table 2.

As illustrated in Table 2, in the absence of an outlier effect, the power for our method is slightly lower than the other two methods. As this effect becomes more pronounced, our method gains an advantage with respect to power. A similar trend is observed under simulation model 2. One should note that the power listed for https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT under this scenario is not the power at the two-sided FWER level of 0.05, but rather the power at the inflated type I error rate as observed in Table 1. As such, it is erroneous to conclude that that the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT method is more powerful.
Table 2

Illustration of the empirical Power based on a nominal two-sided 0.05 FWER level, with m= 200 genes, N= 200 simulation samples and B= 200 resampling replications per sample. The outlier law realizes values -4,0 or 4 with probabilities π/2, 1 - π and π/2 respectively. Under simulation model 1, the outlier effect is added to all time-points. Under simulation model 2, the outlier effect is only added to the first and last time-points.

  

Simulation 1

Simulation 2

π

ρ

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT

0

0

0.960

0.995

0.995

   
 

0.3

0.880

0.940

0.925

   
 

0.6

0.750

0.855

0.845

   

0.05

0

0.910

0.800

0.790

0.890

0.880

0.970

 

0.3

0.835

0.755

0.755

0.845

0.825

0.900

 

0.6

0.680

0.630

0.605

0.835

0.805

0.935

0.1

0

0.760

0.485

0.480

0.895

0.740

0.930

 

0.3

0.675

0.415

0.425

0.660

0.585

0.885

 

0.6

0.650

0.410

0.370

0.730

0.530

0.895

we evaluated the empirical power and FWER under the simulation model 1 and 2 for π = 2. The result of π = 2 have a similar trend the results of π = 0.05 and π = 0.1 under simulation model 1 and 2. We also evaluated the different proportions for 20 prognostic genes (10%) and 180 non-prognostic genes (90%) and 5 prognostic genes (2.5%) and 195 non-prognostic genes (97.5%). These results have a similar trend the result of 10 prognostic genes (5%) and 190 non-prognostic genes (95%).

Case Study

In this section, we will summarize the results from applying our proposed method to the Caenorhabditis elegans dauer data. Wang and Kim [1] use cDNA microarrays to profile gene expression time-trajectories during the transition from the dauer state to the non-dauer state (experimental group) and after feeding of starved first laval stage worms (control group). The cDNA microarray expressions were measured on m = 18, 556 genes. For the experimental group, the worms are harvested at 0, 1.5, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, and 12 hours after feeding with three to four replicates at each time-point. For the control group, are harvested 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10, and 12 hours after feeding withe four replicates at each time-point. For this illustration, we have set the t = 1.5 time-point in the experimental group to t = 1. This data set is available for download from http://​cmgm.​stanford.​edu/​~kimlab/​dauer/​.

For the case study based on the Wang and Kim [1] data, the number of significant genes, identified at a given FWER (0, 0.2] based on each of the three methods, is shown in Figure 2. We note that for smaller FWER levels (less than 0.05), the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT method identifies the largest while the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM method identifies the smallest number of significant genes. This is reversed for larger FWER levels. The number of significant genes identified by the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM method is consistently between the numbers identified by the other two methods. The set of significant genes identified by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM is, however, not a proper subset of genes identified by methods. In other words, the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM method is identifying potentially novel genes missed by the other two methods.
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Fig2_HTML.jpg
Figure 2

The number of significant genes at a given FWER level (from 0 to 0.2) based on the -PERM, -BOOT and -PERM adjusted P -values.

We provide a Venn diagram on the set of of genes identified as significant at the 0.05 FWER level in Figure 3. There are 1974 significant genes in common among the three methods. The https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM identifies 168 genes not identified by the other two methods. We rank these 168 genes according to the difference of their respective P-values from the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM and https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM methods and show the top nine genes according to this ranking in Figure 4. As illustrated in the simulation study, the mean model by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif regression is not robust to the outliers. There are 379 genes identified as significant by the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT method only. The top nine genes, based on the magnitude of the differences of the corresponding 379 https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -BOOT and https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM FWER P-values, are shown in Figure 5. As illustrated in the simulation study, https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT may be severely anti-conservative if the error terms are heterogeneous over time [7]. The supplementary material provides the biological properties of 40 genes (out of 168) that are identified only by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM [see Additional file 1].
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Fig3_HTML.jpg
Figure 3

Venn diagrams for the number of significant genes at the 0.05 FWER level based on the -PERM, -BOOT and -PERM adjusted P -values.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Fig4_HTML.jpg
Figure 4

Observed expressions and estimated expression trajectories for the top four genes, from the [1]data, among the 168 genes identified by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM but neither by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM nor by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT, at the 0.05 FWER level, are shown here. For each of these 168 genes, we calculate the absolute difference between the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM and https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM FWER P-values. The top nine genes ranked according to the magnitude of these differences are selected. The observations from the control and experimental arms are represented by 'x' (blue) and 'o' (red) respectively while the group-wise quantile and mean regression curves are denoted by dashed and solid lines respectively. The adjusted P-value by -PERM is provided for each gene.

https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Fig5_HTML.jpg
Figure 5

Observed expressions and estimated expression trajectories for the top four genes, from the [1]data, among the 379 genes identified by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT but neither by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM nor by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif -PERM, at the 0.05 FWER level, are shown here. For each of these 379 genes, we calculate the absolute difference between the https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM and https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -BOOT FWER P-values. The top nine genes ranked according to the magnitude of these differences are selected. The observations from the control and experimental arms are represented by 'x' (blue) and 'o' (red) respectively while the group-wise quantile and mean regression curves are denoted by dashed and solid lines respectively. The adjusted P-value by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif -PERM is provided for each gene.

Discussion

In these discussions, we have assumed that any difference, including vertical shifts, among the time trajectories, are biologically relevant and of interest. In some applications, one may want to ignore vertical shifts, as these may be often caused by batch effects, and primarily focus on genes for which there are actual differences among the time trends. The procedures we have discussed can be easily modified to accommodate this situation. To this end, for gene https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq15_HTML.gif , the K sample means for each group are computed. The algorithm is then applied to the centered versions of the observed expressions https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq16_HTML.gif . Although the illustration presented in this paper have been limited to the two-sample case (K = 2), as shown in the methods section, the method can be extended to the case where K > 2. The method can be easily extended to account for multiplicity by controlling a false-discovery rate (FDR). The unadjusted permutation P-value for gene j, based on the notation in the algorithm presented in the methods section, is https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq17_HTML.gif . FDR adjusted P-values can then be computed based on these unadjusted P-values. We finally note that the method can also be applied in the one-sample cases. In this setting, one is interested in identifying genes whose time-trajectories are time-dependent. The marginal hypotheses are formulated as testing H j : g j (t) = c j for all t > 0 versus H j : g j (t) ≠ c j for some t > 0 for a constant say c j . As under the null, all of the expressions are exchangeable, the null sampling distribution is generated by permuting all observed expressions for a given gene. The corresponding https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif null residual error is obtained as https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq18_HTML.gif where https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq19_HTML.gif is the sample mean for the n expressions observed for gene j. For many regressions problems, the target function to be estimated is the mean of the distribution of the outcome conditional on a set of co-variables. In a time-course microarray experiment, this would correspond to the mean of the expression profile over time. In this paper, we have proposed to estimate the conditional quantile, rather than the conditional mean, of the distribution of the outcome variable a as function of time. Specifically, we use the special case of the median. Consider the standard additive mean regression problem of the form Y i = g(t i ) + ϵ i , where g(t) is the conditional mean of Y at time t and ϵ is a mean-zero error term. One criterion that is often used to find an estimate of g is to minimize Σ i (Y i - g(t i ))2. Restricting this optimization to the set of linear functions yields the standard least-squares estimate. Optimizing over the set of all "smooth" functions yields an estimator that interpolates the observations. As a balancing act between these two extremes, one may consider optimizing the following criterion
https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_Equj_HTML.gif

where ∫(g''(t))2dt is a so called penalty term. The amount of smoothing is determined by the parameter λ (0, ∞). The estimation procedure used in this paper is based on a similar regularization approach where the terms (y i - g(t i ))2 are replaced by ρ(y i - g(t i )) and the penalty term ∫(g''(t))2dt is replaced ∫|g''(t)|dt.

Conclusion

We proposed a robust method for identifying genes whose time trajectories depend on a phenotypic or experimental factor. Furthermore, we proposed a multiple testing procedure to adjust for multiplicity. Our method is based on https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq1_HTML.gif regression type estimator. Through an extensive simulation study, we observed our method accurately control the FWER and the mean model by https://static-content.springer.com/image/art%3A10.1186%2F1471-2105-11-391/MediaObjects/12859_2010_Article_3848_IEq14_HTML.gif regression is not robust to the outliers.

Declarations

Acknowledgements

The authors thank reviewers and the associated editor for insightful comments, which substantially improved the paper. Partial support for this research was provided by grant from the National Cancer Institute, CA142538 [KO, SHJ, SLG].

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Center, Samsung Cancer Research Institute, Samsung Medical Center
(2)
Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Duke University Medical Center
(3)
CALGB Statistical Center
(4)
R&D Center, Komipharm International Co., LTD

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© Sohn et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. 2010

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://​creativecommons.​org/​licenses/​by/​2.​0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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