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Table 2 Statistical tests for variant edges

From: Reconstructing cancer genomes from paired-end sequencing data

Reciproc al vs. N on Reciprocal Variant Edges
Dataset VariantType R (all) R ¯ (all) R (non-triv) R ¯ (non-triv) NR N R ¯ p-Val
OV1 T 179 41 75 13 9 58 < 1E-15
OV1 I 46 20 16 12 2 29 3.46E-5
OV1 TO 210 46 70 16 9 38 2.79E-12
OV2 T 77 51 41 23 12 49 5.17E-7
OV2 I 21 15 9 5 10 21 0.057
OV2 TO 96 64 46 18 15 44 2.63E-7
OV3 T 61 13 19 3 6 30 2.111E-7
OV3 I 19 13 5 5 2 13 0.075
OV3 TO 58 26 22 8 7 28 1.92E-5
OV4 T 74 16 40 6 12 35 1.54E-9
OV4 I 10 0 2 0 3 12 0.073
OV4 TO 48 22 22 10 12 26 0.0036
OV5 T 93 19 29 7 8 37 2.30E-8
OV5 I 12 8 2 0 6 13 0.13
OV5 TO 82 26 22 8 7 34 2.29E-6
  1. Results of Fisher's exact test showing that non-trivial reciprocal edges are more likely to be used (assigned a multiplicity μ > 0) in the interval-adjacency graph than non-reciprocal variant edges when a minimum of 5 discordant pairs is required to add a variant edge to the graph. Variant edges are classified as Inversion (I), Translocation (T), and Robertsonian Translocation (TO). Each variant edge is also classified as either reciprocal or not and by whether it is used (μ > 0) or not used (μ = 0). We report the number of edges of the following types: used reciprocal edges (R(all)), non used reciprocal edges ( R ¯ (all), used reciprocal non-trivial (R(non-triv)), not used reciprocal non-trivial ( R ¯ (non-triv)), used non-reciprocal (NR), and not used non-reciprocal ( N R ¯ ).
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